Topic
Enduring Understanding
Essential Question
Performance Assessment
One point perspective - a technique that artists use to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional plane.
  • Space is an element of design.
  • The illusion of three-dimensional space can be created with the help of shading, which gives it a feeling of depth.
  • Space can also be created by overlapping objects in a composition.
  • Space is the area in an artistic composition provided for a particular purpose to show depth.
  • Space may have two dimensions (length and width), such as a floor, or it may have three dimensions (length, width, and height).
  • Space includes the background, foreground and middle ground.
  • Space refers to the distances or areas around, between or within components of a piece.
What are the ways that artists can create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional plane? How is one-point perspective constructed in a visual arts construction?
Artists can use the principles of linear perspective to create the concept of space on a two-dimensional plane.

How are some of the ways that artists create the illusion of three dimensional space on a two-dimensional plane?
In preparation for using the Smart Board to help students understand how to understand and create converging lines as a technique that artists use to create the illusion of space on a two dimensional plane, we will create landscape compositions in art class.
The student's landscape compositions will include:
a horizon line (the imaginary line that separates the sky from everything below it, eg: land, water, buildings, etc.), and
include examples of ways that artists depict the illusion of space.

There are six basic techniques for depicting space on a two dimensional plane:
1) overlapping objects (to create the illusion that one object is in front of another,
2) making objects that appear in the foreground (front) of a composition larger and those that appear in the background (distant) in the composition smaller,
3) making the objects that appear to be closer to the view brighter in color and making objects that appear farther away from the view less colorful,
4) making the objects that are nearer to the viewer exhibit greater detail and making objects that are in the distance exhibit less detail and
5) moving objects that appear to be closer to the viewer down the picture plane (closer to the bottom of the composition) and objects that appear farther away from the viewer up the picture plane (closer to the top of the composition) and
6) parallel lines, such as roads, fences, railroad tracks, etc. appear to converge in the distance (towards the horizon line) at a vanishing point

Activities
-students will trace the horizon line on a transparacy over a piece of art in teams to identify the vanishing point as teacher mode
- first with a photo, second with a piece of art
- stidemts complete a drawing on a worksheet that contains orthogonals
-students then create a composition where they demonstrate their understanding of parallel lines converging at a point on the horizon